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A Tombstone tombstone

A Tombstone tombstone
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This tombstone actually exists in Tombstone, Arizona, in the Boothill Graveyard. While there are a number of interesting epitaphs there, including Frank Bowles’ (“As you pass by, remember that as you are so once was I, and as I am you soon will be….”) and Margarita’s (“Stabbed by gold dollar”), we’re partial to Lester Moore’s. A Wells Fargo Station agent in Naco, Arizona, he met his end when he delivered a damaged package to a disgruntled, and armed, Hank Dunstan, who also died of gunshot wounds in the ensuing scuffle. Moore’s epitaph reads: “Here lies Lester Moore, Four slugs from a 44, No Les, No more.”

Dark humour

Dark humour
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Clearly, Frances Eileen Thatcher was well-loved by her family and friends, who wrote kindly of her “beautiful heart” in her 2006 obituary. What they didn’t mention was her sense of humour, which must be inferred by the inscription on the back of her tombstone, “Damn, it’s dark down here.”

By the way, science shows that if you love dark humour, you just might be a genius.

Definitely preferable

Definitely preferable
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When Dr Edward Russell Gann died in 1983 in Sigourney, Iowa, his wife and son had inscribed on his tombstone: “I’d rather be in Acapulco.” One can only hope they weren’t suggesting he had likely gone to someplace else that was very hot.

Expiration date

Expiration date
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When Barbara Sue Manire “expired” on her 64th birthday in 2005, her children made sure her legacy of humour would live on in the form of a parking meter with a “64-year time limit.” Apparently, it was what Barbara wanted, too.

Swedish fish

Swedish fish
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Genevieve Adeline Batty (1918–2005) spent her formative years in the Swedish community of Lindsborg, Kansas. Although she later moved to Wyoming, it’s clear she never forgot her roots because on her tombstone, it is inscribed, “I’m Swedish, pass the lutefisk.” It’s also clear Mrs Batty had quite the sense of humour, since “the truth about lutefisk is you should never eat lutefisk,” which is codfish marinated in lye until it’s acidic enough to cause a chemical burn and then soaked in water and steamed into stinky, gelatinous submission.

Check out these thesaurus jokes all grammar nerds will love. 

A dentist with a sense of humour

A dentist with a sense of humour
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Both John Denby and his son, Maurice, were dentists. When John, born in 1870, passed away in 1927, his tombstone was inscribed with the phrase: “I’m filling my last cavity.” When Maurice passed in 1964, “Me too” was added to the stone.

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Pardon the pun

Pardon the pun
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“Here lies John Yeast. Pardon me for not rising.” How many bread jokes do you think John heard (and used) over the course of his life? In case you were wondering, this cheeky tombstone is in Ruidoso, New Mexico.

Here are 23 Harry Potter jokes and puns that every muggle should know. 

The final word

The final word
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By the time author Edward Paul Abbey died in 1989, he had published 19 books. Despite the fact that Abbey was a man of many words, his epitaph reads simply, “No comment.”

The joke’s on us

The joke’s on us
COURTESY ROBERT CUTTS

In 1832, a 33-year-old Welshman died, leaving behind a wife, two sons, and a mystery: What was the man’s name? Where his name should have been on his tombstone, there’s instead a 285-letter cryptic crossword puzzle that he is said to have designed himself. The cryptogram, itself, isn’t particularly hard to decipher. If you trace the letters, you’ll see that no matter which direction you go, the message is the same: Here lies John Renie. What is harder to understand is why, as it turns out, this is not where the body of John Renie lies.

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Source: RD.com

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