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The inside scoop on how supermarkets work

The inside scoop on how supermarkets work
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Food experts, industry analysts and store employees share their insider strategies on how to save money on groceries, stay healthy and beat the supermarkets at their own game.

We’re very aware of the role that the senses play in marketing

We’re very aware of the role that the senses play in marketing
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When you walk in the door, you smell bread baking or rotisserie chicken roasting in the deli area because we know those smells get your salivary glands working. When you’re salivating, you’re a much less disciplined shopper. —Paco Underhill, consumer expert and author of What Women Want: The Science of Female Shopping

It’s no accident that shopping carts are getting bigger

It’s no accident that shopping carts are getting bigger
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We doubled their size as a test, and customers bought 19 percent more. —Martin Lindstrom, marketing consultant and author of Brandwashed: Tricks Companies Use to Manipulate Our Minds and Persuade Us to Buy

Spend less at the supermarket with these smart tips savvy shoppers use. 

The more people buy, the more they consume

The more people buy, the more they consume
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If you used to buy a six-pack of soft drinks and drink six cans a week but now buy a 12-pack because that’s the current standard size, you’re probably going to start drinking 12 cans a week. Be mindful when buying larger sizes to make sure your habits don’t change as a result. —Jeff Weidauer, former supermarket executive and vice president of marketing for Vestcom, a retail services company

Here are 12 things that happen to your body when you stop drinking fizzy drinks.

The average consumer tends to remember the price of only four items

The average consumer tends to remember the price of only four items
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Milk, bread, bananas and eggs. Ninety-five percent of shoppers have no idea what all the other items cost and don’t know if they’re getting a good deal when they buy them. —Martin Lindstrom

The produce department is at the front of the store because…

The produce department is at the front of the store because…
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…its bright colours put you in a good mood and inspire you to buy more. That’s why I recommend that you start shopping in the middle of the store, with its bland boxes and cans. —Phil Lempert, grocery industry expert and editor of supermarketguru.com

Here are 8 clear signs you’re not eating enough fruit and vegetables. 

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Over 60 percent of shoppers off-load products as they check out

Over 60 percent of shoppers off-load products as they check out
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So supermarkets started making checkout lanes narrower, with less shelf space, which means it’s harder to ditch goods at the last minute. —Martin Lindstrom

Here are 13 rude things you need to stop doing at the supermarket. 

We let you linger … and it’s good for business

We let you linger … and it’s good for business
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Customers would tell me as they went through the checkout, “I just stopped in to get eggs,” and they would have $250 worth of stuff. —Jason Swett, former bagger and cashier at a grocery store in Kalamazoo, Michigan.

Here are 5 tips to help you cut down on food waste. 

To save money, wear headphones and listen to upbeat music as you shop

To save money, wear headphones and listen to upbeat music as you shop
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Many stores play music with a rhythm that’s much slower than the average heartbeat, which makes you spend more time in the store – and buy 29 percent more. —Martin Lindstrom

Supermarkets aren’t out to steal from you

Supermarkets aren’t out to steal from you
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The average supermarket makes about 1.5 percent net profit a year. To give you some idea of how low that is, the profit margin for clothing stores can be several times that. —Phil Lempert

Stop buying these things and save a ton of money. 

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Please be advised that due to the current lockdown in the Philippines, we hope to have the April print issue available by the middle of July, and the May, June and July issues available by the end of July, but this is dependent on when local lockdown restrictions are lifted. We sincerely apologise for this inconvenience. Thank you and stay safe!
– The Reader’s Digest team