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Know what to eat

Know what to eat
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Take 160 mg of soy isoflavones per day or pour soy milk over your cereal. Soy consumption may keep glowing skin healthy by supplying high-quality protein needed for building and maintaining collagen, the material essential to connective tissues, says medical research director, Dr Aaron Tabor. Soy isoflavones may also act as antioxidants to protect collagen from damage caused by free radicals, highly reactive molecules that can weaken or destroy cell membranes. Free radicals can also damage DNA, create age spots and wrinkles, and depress the immune system, increasing the risk of skin cancer. Good sources of soy isoflavones include soy milk (20-35 mg soy isoflavones per serving) and tofu (20-30 mg soy isoflavones per serving).

Find out which are the best foods for younger skin.

Grill salmon brushed with olive oil and sprinkled with toasted, crushed walnuts

Grill salmon brushed with olive oil and sprinkled with toasted, crushed walnuts
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There, you’ve just gotten a skin-healthy dose of poly- and monounsaturated fats, particularly omega-3 fatty acids, which studies suggest may affect the amount of sun and ageing damage your skin experiences. Without them, you’ll also show the signs you aren’t eating enough healthy fats, such as dry skin. By extension, make sure olive oil is the primary source of fat in your cooking each and every day, and try to have salmon twice a week or more to support glowing skin.

Try this grilled salmon in ciabatta – it’s delicious and good for your skin.

Cook with garlic every day

Cook with garlic every day
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Because garlic contains antibacterial properties, it may help clear up P. acnes, or the acne-causing bacteria that lurks on your skin. Avoid rubbing the garlic directly onto your acne, as dermatologist, Dr Jeremy A. Brauer, warns that it may result in an irritant or allergic contact dermatitis.

Give cheers for glowing skin

Give cheers for glowing skin
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Brew a pot of tea, chill, then store in the fridge and drink throughout the day. Tea, as you probably know, is a great source of antioxidants, molecules that fight the free-radical damage caused by sun exposure and cigarette smoking, which ruins glowing skin. One study published in the journal Photodermatology, Photoimmunology and Photomedicine found that the polyphenols in tea were helpful in preventing UVB-induced skin cancer.

Tea has many benefits, this is what happens to your body when you drink tea every day.

Stop with one glass of wine or one alcoholic drink

Stop with one glass of wine or one alcoholic drink
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Alcohol, including wine, can act as a vasodilator, meaning it dilates blood vessels, explains Dr Brauer. “This may be most noticeable in facial skin, resulting in a flushed or ruddy appearance,” he says. “Rosacea, however, while not caused by alcohol, can certainly be made worse or flare due to alcohol intake.”

Add supplements

Add supplements
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Pop a high-potency multivitamin every day (with your doctor’s okay). Many nutrients are vital to glowing skin, including vitamins C, A, and B. The most reliable way to get them all every day is to eat well, as well as take a daily supplement.

Read on for how to make vitamins and minerals work better for you.

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Take rose hips every morning to help build collagen

Take rose hips every morning to help build collagen
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Rich in vitamin C, rose hips (available at chemists) can help keep skin smooth, youthful and glowing. “Rose hip contains the seed of the rose plant, and fresh rose hip is a good source of vitamin C,” says Dr Brauer. “Vitamin C is routinely used in topical products for its antioxidant benefits, as well as improvement in skin tone and texture.”

Prepare for the outdoors

Prepare for the outdoors
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If you’re gearing up for a day in the sun, steer clear of scented lotions and perfumes. Scented products can lead to blotchy skin when exposed to the sun. “We regularly suggest that patients who are prone to the development of allergies and atopic dermatitis avoid fragrances/opt for fragrance-free detergents, soaps, lotions, etc.,” says Dr Brauer. “Specifically, citrus-based products can result in a condition known as phytophotodermatitis (more commonly seen after being sprayed by lemon or lime juice while out in the sun).”

Go for a run, ride your bike, or work out in the garden on a hot day

Go for a run, ride your bike, or work out in the garden on a hot day
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Anything that gets you sweating is good news for your skin. Sweating is nature’s way of eliminating toxic chemicals that can build up under the skin. Plus, regular exercise maintains healthy circulation and blood flow throughout your body, including your skin. If you’re exercising outdoors, though, remember to wear a sunscreen on your face that protects against UVA and UVB rays or a moisturiser with sunscreen protection.

Before you take up running, check out the pros and cons.

Apply a cream containing vitamin C to your face over your sunblock

Apply a cream containing vitamin C to your face over your sunblock
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This will provide double protection. The cream helps prevent facial skin damage, dehydration, and wrinkles. Also, try creams containing vitamin E or beta-carotene.

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Philippines lockdown update:
Please be advised that due to the current lockdown in the Philippines, Reader’s Digest magazine May issue will not be available at its regular on-sale date to our subscribers or through our retail channels in that region. We hope to have the issues available in early June, but this is dependent on when the lockdown restrictions are lifted. We sincerely apologise for this inconvenience. Thank you and stay safe!
– The Reader’s Digest team