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Don’t drastically diet

Don’t drastically diet
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“Young, active women can actually harm their bones by excessive exercise without meeting their daily energy needs,” says Dr Bruene. Translation: if you exercise too much and eat too little, your bone density can decrease. That’s because running on empty often halts menstrual cycles, lowering the oestrogen level in the body, she explains. Oestrogen is a pro-bone hormone. Staying active is great, but make sure you’re eating enough, too.

Go easy on the burgers

Go easy on the burgers
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“Large amounts of animal protein can affect the kidneys, which then leads to loss of calcium,” says Rosas-Osnaya. “This will lead to a low calcium level in the body, which may contribute to bone loss,” she says. Make sure that you’re filling your plate with three-quarters of plant-based eats and you’ll find a good balance.

Cook with herbs

Cook with herbs
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Spicing up dishes with oregano, smoked paprika, garlic powder and other herbs and spices can help you cut back on the salt in cooking. “Foods high in salt affect the body’s ability to retain calcium,” notes Rosas-Osnaya. In addition to reducing sodium in cooking, also limit high-sodium snacks like chips.

Order tofu

Order tofu
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Fitting soy in your diet is another smart move for healthy bones, according to the International Osteoporosis Foundation. Most brands of soymilk are fortified with calcium so that you may be able to get about the same amount of calcium from a glass of soymilk as you would from a glass of regular milk, the group states.

Get your java wisely

Get your java wisely
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Coffee has so many health benefits, but knocking back more than three cups a day can impair calcium absorption in your body, notes Rosas-Osnaya. Get your java wake-up, but limit yourself to one or two cups daily.

Check your meds

Check your meds
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“There are many medications that negatively contribute to bone loss,” says Rosas-Osnaya. However, there’s typically a reason why you’re taking these, she points out, so talk to your doctor about any meds you’re on and how they may impact your bone health. A few that can interfere with a strong skeleton include: steroids, proton pump inhibitors, antacids that contain aluminium and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), she notes. You may be able to swap them out for treatment that may help those who already have severe osteoporosis.

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Eat more olives

Eat more olives
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Yep, the little green or black fruits (as well as olive oil) may provide a dose of powerful antioxidants that reduces oxidative stress and inflammation that can harm bones, according to 2016 research in the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. They may also promote bone cell formation. Olive oil can also boost your health in innumerable ways (and may even help lengthen your life).

Ask if you need an Rx

Ask if you need an Rx
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Every day your body is constantly breaking down old bone and forming new bone. If your doctor is worried about your bone health, you may be prescribed what’s called an antiresorptive medication, which slows the break down and reabsorption of bone, Rosas-Osnaya explains. The Rxs can help prevent osteoporosis. Some options include Fosamax, Boniva and Evista. Check out these 40 ways to slash your risk for the brittle bone disease osteoporosis.

Wear the right footwear

Wear the right footwear
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There’s always a risk of tripping and falling if you’re an older adult. In that case, Dr Lin tells his patients to avoid any shoe that can make you trip, fall and suffer a hip fracture – not to mention cause pain. “I have witnessed several fractures from tripping in sandals, flip flops, platforms and high heels,” he says. Instead, choose comfy, well-fitting athletic shoes that have good traction and shock absorption.

Load up on greens

Load up on greens
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“Dairy often gets the most attention for calcium and vitamin D, but green vegetables are also a very strong source. Plus they provide fibre, other essential vitamins and are low in calories,” says Jeremy Alland, MD, a sports medicine and primary care physician. Some, like beet greens, are considered a superfood.

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Philippines lockdown update:
Please be advised that due to the current lockdown in the Philippines, Reader’s Digest magazine May issue will not be available at its regular on-sale date to our subscribers or through our retail channels in that region. We hope to have the issues available in early June, but this is dependent on when the lockdown restrictions are lifted. We sincerely apologise for this inconvenience. Thank you and stay safe!
– The Reader’s Digest team