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Understand Alzheimer’s disease

Understand Alzheimer’s disease
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Alzheimer’s disease is the leading cause of dementia, accounting for approximately 80 percent of dementia cases. But all dementia is not Alzheimer’s, says David Knopman, MD, a neurologist at the Mayo Clinic. Dementia is a general term used to describe a set of symptoms that may include memory loss and difficulties with thinking, problem-solving, or language. Alzheimer’s is a physical disease that targets the brain, causing problems with memory, thinking, and behaviour. It is also age-related (symptoms usually start at age 65) and progressive as symptoms usually develop slowly and worsen over time. Research shows that plaques and tangles, two proteins that build up and block connections between nerve cells and eventually damage and kill nerve cells in the brain, cause the symptoms of the disease.

Get a baseline brain scan

Get a baseline brain scan
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Neuroimaging, using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or computed tomography (CT), is one of the most promising areas of research for the early detection of Alzheimer’s disease, according to the Alzheimer’s Association. “The idea is to start prevention early,” says Gayatri Devi, MD, neurologist and clinical professor of neurology. “We get routine colonoscopies in our fifties, but the risk for colon cancer is less than the risk for dementia.” Structural imaging can reveal tumours, evidence of strokes, damage from severe head trauma, or a buildup of fluid in the brain. “A baseline brain MRI can reveal the evidence of mini-strokes that you may have had without knowing,” says Dr. Devi. Find out about the 6 stroke symptoms you might be ignoring.

Get enough sleep

Get enough sleep
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When you toss and turn all night, levels of brain-damaging proteins in the cerebrospinal fluid can rise: One study suggests that those with chronic sleep problems during middle age may increase their risk of Alzheimer’s later in life. “You have to commit to the importance of sleep,” says Dr. Devi. “I prioritise sleep as one of the most important activities I do – I will leave a party early in order to get a good night’s sleep.” Find some great advice on how to sleep better every night.

Stay socially active

Stay socially active
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Say yes to those social invitations! Studies reveal that people with a large social network are at lower risk of Alzheimer’s and dementia. “There is something intrinsically valuable about social engagement,” says Dr. Knopman. “It makes sense that those who are more engaged, especially socially, will think more positively and have a better outlook on life.” Avoiding social interactions can actually be an early warning sign of dementia. Find out some others here.

Keep learning

Keep learning
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People with advanced degrees have a lower risk of Alzheimer’s. Education seems to build a “cognitive reserve,” which enables the brain to better resist neurological damage. “Higher education has a powerful effect,” says Dr. Knopman. It’s never too late – check out the continuing education courses offered near you. Along with learning, here are 19 things you can do in under 10 minutes to live longer.

Be bilingual

Be bilingual
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Speaking more than one language can protect against Alzheimer’s disease and other types of dementia, according to research. While no one is sure why a second language helps so much, Dr. Knopman theorises that the effort to communicate bilingually is like a workout for the brain, helping preserve grey matter and neurons. These 51 everyday habits reduce your risk of dementia.

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Do it yourself

Do it yourself
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Challenging your brain in new ways can enhance memory as you age. Dr. Devi has her own take on this: “If there is a problem with the phone or the plumbing, I will try to fix it,” she says. “If I try to figure out how to fix this on my own, it is good for my brain.” Right now she’s designing and building a window seat. “It is a way to keep different parts of my brain thriving.” Check out these 6 simple games to build a happy and resilient brain.

Stay active

Stay active
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Exercise is crucial to your wellness and your brain. In research, people who exercise regularly can slow cognitive decline by as much as 38 percent. According to the Alzheimer’s Society, the combined results of 11 studies indicate that regular exercise can reduce the risk of developing dementia by about 30 percent; it drops the risk of Alzheimer’s by 45 percent. “When you are physically active, you burn more kilojoules and you’re less likely to be obese,” explains Dr. Knopman. “You’ll have better cardiovascular health because you are pushing your heart rate.” Here are 7 golden rules of fitness you should be following.

Try turmeric

Try turmeric
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Turmeric contains curcumin, a chemical that has been shown to help with inflammation. Used to treat a variety of ailments and conditions such as osteoarthritis and high cholesterol, turmeric has also shown promise as a treatment for Alzheimer’s disease. Dr. Devi notes that the research is preliminary, but it suggests that curcumin can help keep the nerve cells functioning and healthy. “You want to keep as many nerve cells functioning with as many connections as possible,” he says.

Take care of your heart

Take care of your heart
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“What is good for the heart is good for the brain,” says Dr. Devi. Conditions such as high blood pressure, diabetes and high cholesterol, which increase the risk of cardiovascular disease, may also increase the risk of developing Alzheimer’s, and a new study shows that middle-aged people with risk factors for heart attacks and stroke are also more likely to develop changes in the brain that can lead to the disease. “Anything that keeps the heart healthy is directly related to brain health,” Dr. Devi says. Follow this advice to take control of your heart health.

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Reader’s Digest Magazine delayed due to coronavirus
Please be advised that due to the current lockdown in Malaysia and the Philippines, Reader’s Digest magazine will not be available at its regular on-sale date to our subscribers or through our retail channels in these regions. We hope to have the issues available around 15 April in Malaysia and around 24 April in the Philippines, but this is dependent on when the lockdown restrictions are lifted. We sincerely apologise for this inconvenience.
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– The Reader’s Digest team