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Doing intense workouts your first week

Doing intense workouts your first week
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As your body adapts in the first week or two of your low-carb diet, you probably feel weaker, have lower energy, and even feel light-headed. It’s not a good time to go on a cycling trip or try a Crossfit class. It takes time for your body to switch over to using fat as a fuel source rather than primarily carbohydrates. Make sure you’re getting enough rest and do lighter exercises such as walking and yoga until you start feeling more energized. There are many ways to exercise – and excuses for failing to do the amount your weight loss target needs. Try these strategies for overcoming that anti-exercise voice in your head.

Eating too many calories

Eating too many calories
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Although it’s easy to eat too little on a low-carb diet, overeating can occur as well. Many low-carb foods are also kilojoule-dense and easy to snack on. Nuts and cheese are the most common culprits. For example, a cup of macadamia nuts is 962 calories, leaving little room in your day for other foods and nutrients. A cup of shredded cheddar cheese has 460 calories – and you add easily add that much when sprinkling it over your eggs, vegetables, and low-carb pizza.

Think of these foods as toppings to add flavour and nutrients to your meals and snacks rather than foods you can eat by the bowlful.

Drinking alcohol

Drinking alcohol
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There are some types of alcohol that are lower in carbs, such as vodka and tequila. But while you can have some alcohol on a low carb diet, be aware that it will slow down your weight loss. Alcohol not only adds empty kilojoules (zero nutrition), it also gets processed by your body ahead of other kilojoules. Hormones and blood sugar levels can get thrown off, and alcohol can negatively impact your sleep. Beyond that, alcohol famously lowers inhibitions, so it could lead to you going off your diet or eating more than you planned. If your weight loss has stalled, take a look at your booze intake. Read this to learn how alcohol is a big contributor to a big belly.

Not getting enough sodium

Not getting enough sodium
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You’re used to hearing that you need to cut down on salt, so why is not getting enough a concern? When your body starts burning fat as fuel instead of carbohydrates, your kidneys will dump more water and sodium. That means you’ll look less bloated – and if you had high blood pressure, it could come down a bit. But sometimes you lose too much sodium and you’ll end up feeling dizzy, fatigued, and headachy.

Talk to your doctor if you’ve been told to limit sodium. If you get the green light, try adding some salt to your cooking, as well as having some broth each day. Make sure you drink plenty of water to stay hydrated.

Believing low-carb food labels

Believing low-carb food labels
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You’ve loaded up on low-carb bread and cereal and you’re wondering why your weight loss has stalled. Even if a food says it’s a lower carb option on the package, you still need to look at the Nutrition Facts. The food could be lower than the typical version, but still have more carbs than you want. Don’t believe any blanket statements or claims that are on the front of the package or on a restaurant menu. Check out these other secrets food manufacturers would prefer you did NOT know.

Too many low-carb shakes, bars, and processed food

Too many low-carb shakes, bars, and processed food
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With the increasing popularity of carb-restricted diets, dozens of new bars, shakes, treats, and other products are available. However, says Spritzler, many of them contain questionable ingredients and misleading information about their “net carb” content. For instance, one of the most common sweeteners used in sugar-free products is maltitol, which your body can only partially digest. Another common ingredient in low-carb products is a processed fibre known as isomaltooligosaccharides (IMOs).

Unlike the fibre found in whole foods, IMOs can be partially absorbed by your body and may raise blood sugar levels, research suggests. Because food manufacturers subtract the carbs from sorbitol and IMOs when calculating “net carb” values, the amount you’re truly getting is unknown, says Spritzler. When it comes to achieving a healthy low-carb lifestyle, it’s always best to stick with whole foods rather than packaged or processed items. Make your own sugar-free smoothies with plain Greek yogurt, almond butter, cinnamon, and vanilla. For a treat, have a couple of squares of dark chocolate (85 per cent cocoa or higher) or ½ cup of berries topped with real whipped cream and chopped walnuts.

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Source: RD.com

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