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Pound it out

Pound it out
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To soften inexpensive cuts while also getting a good arm workout, break out the meat mallet. Not only does it flatten out the meat so that it will cook evenly but it also begins to break down some of the tough connective tissue so it will be easier to digest and can soak up any marinade better. If you don’t have a mallet, no worries – you can use a rolling pin or even the bottom of a small saucepan.

Don’t rush the cook time

Don’t rush the cook time
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Low and slow is the name of the game in Holly Storm’s kitchen. The food blogger suggests putting cheaper cuts (like fatty brisket) in the oven or a crockpot at a low temperature for a long time. As the meat cooks, the collagen, which is the protein that makes it tough, begins to dissolve so your meat becomes more tender.

Toss it on the smoker

Toss it on the smoker
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Another “low and slow” method that was basically made for tough types of meat – particularly pork shoulder or ribs – is smoking. Not only does it soften the tough proteins just like the oven and slow cooker do but it also adds that crave-worthy smoky flavour. Warning: You’ll need patience for this style as it takes about one and a half to two hours of cooking time per 500 grams.

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Source: RD.com

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