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Scan at the supermarket

Scan at the supermarket
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Stores are designed to have the most profitable items at eye level, and when you shop you don’t really see everything there.

Brain exercise: Stop in any aisle and look at the shelves, top to bottom. If there’s something you’ve never seen before, pick it up, read the ingredients and think about it. You don’t have to buy it to benefit; you’ve broken your routine and experienced something new.

Do an art project in a group

Do an art project in a group
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Art activates the nonverbal and emotional parts of the cerebral cortex. When you create art, you draw on parts of your brain interested in forms, colours and textures, as well as thought processes very different from the logical, linear thinking that occupies most of your day.

Brain exercise: Ask each person to draw something associated with a specific theme like a season, an emotion or a current event.

Make more social connections during your day

Make more social connections during your day
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Scientific research has repeatedly proved that social deprivation has severe negative effects on overall cognitive abilities.

Brain exercise: Thirsty? Buy a drink from a person rather than a vending machine. Need gas? Pay the clerk at the counter rather than just swiping your credit card at the pump.

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Read differently

Read differently
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When we read aloud or listen to reading, we use very different brain circuits than when we read silently to ourselves.

Brain exercise: Read aloud with your partner or a friend, alternating roles of reader and listener. It may be slow to get through a book, but as a bonus you’ll spend quality time together.

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Eat unfamiliar foods

Eat unfamiliar foods
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Your olfactory system can distinguish millions of odours by activating unique combinations of receptors in your nose. There’s a direct link to the emotional centre of your brain, so new odours may evoke unexpected feelings and associations.

Brain exercise: Choose a cuisine unfamiliar to you, and browse the variety of novel vegetables, seasonings and packaged goods.

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Source: RD.com

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Philippines lockdown update:
Please be advised that due to the current lockdown in the Philippines, Reader’s Digest magazine May issue will not be available at its regular on-sale date to our subscribers or through our retail channels in that region. We hope to have the issues available in early June, but this is dependent on when the lockdown restrictions are lifted. We sincerely apologise for this inconvenience. Thank you and stay safe!
– The Reader’s Digest team