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Humans are not the only creatures that hug

Humans are not the only creatures that hug
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It isn’t just people that like to be physically close to their loved ones. The animal world is filled with tender moments too. Check out these 8 affectionate examples from the animal kingdom that don’t mind the occasional hug…

Loving lions

Even the ‘king of the beasts’ needs a bit of tender loving care every now and then. These two males obviously enjoy the togetherness. In the case of lions, cuddling may help to reinforce friendships that become necessary to protect the lions’ territory from intruders.

Kindly keas

Kindly keas
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Keas are known mainly for their curiosity and propensity for pranks. These intelligent mountain parrots from New Zealand also know how to relax, preferably with a companion skilled in grooming those emerald-green feathers.

Bear hugs

Bear hugs
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Grizzly bears are known to be violently aggressive and, above all, loners, but these two adolescents beg to differ. They decided to de-escalate their little brawl in a ‘bear hug’, and look almost as cute as teddy bears.

Cuddling for survival

Cuddling for survival
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For these penguin babies, cuddling is necessary for mere survival. In sub-zero conditions, the body heat from the group prevents the individual chicks from succumbing to the icy weather. And, of course, everyone gets a stint in the middle where it is the warmest. Speaking of affectionate, are these the best dog breeds in the world?

Pacifist primates

Pacifist primates
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Bonobos usually find non-violent ways to settle their conflicts. These pacifists of the primates try first to hug away smaller misunderstandings, disputes or stress situations, as these two orphans from the Congo are demonstrating. Check out the pet combinations that are most likely to hate each other.

Watery embrace

Watery embrace
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The proximity of this humpback whale mother to her calf is not just an expression of affection, it also helps protect the young animal from would-be predators. To avoid attracting such unwanted company, the mother communicates with her offspring through physical touch or ‘whispered’ tones. Check out these 28 ways your pet is trying to say “I love you”.

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Reach out and touch

Reach out and touch
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Giraffes use their extremely long necks to get to hard-to-reach food high up in trees, or to fight their rivals. These two, however, have found a different use, tenderly grooming each other’s manes. Check out these 28 amazing wildlife encounters experienced by Reader’s Digest readers.

Self-hugging seal

Self-hugging seal
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The southern elephant seal spends roughly 90 per cent of its life in water, being on land only during mating season. The males aren’t exactly known to be romantics. After pairing, they immediately begin flirting with the next female. Deserted, this female comforted herself with a tight hug.

Next, check out these 45 interesting facts about your favourite animals.

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Please be advised that due to the current lockdown in the Philippines, Reader’s Digest magazine May issue will not be available at its regular on-sale date to our subscribers or through our retail channels in that region. We hope to have the issues available in early June, but this is dependent on when the lockdown restrictions are lifted. We sincerely apologise for this inconvenience. Thank you and stay safe!
– The Reader’s Digest team