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Beck vs. beckon

Beck vs. beckon
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Right: She’s at your beck and call.

Wrong: She’s at your beckon call.

What the idiom means: She’ll be on hand to help you whenever you need it!

Here are 10 things most of us think are the same – but aren’t. 

Chalk vs. chock

Chalk vs. chock
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Right: Chalk it up to the good weather.

Wrong: Chock it up to the good weather.

What the idiom means: Chalk it up means crediting something with a reason.

Think vs. thing

Think vs. thing
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Right: You’ve got another think coming!

Wrong: You’ve got another thing coming!

What the idiom means: Watch out—if you think this is the result of your action, think again!

Scapegoat vs. escape goat

Scapegoat vs. escape goat
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Right: Don’t use your friend as a scapegoat.

Wrong: Don’t use your friend as an escape goat.

What the idiom means: A scapegoat is someone who is blamed for something.

Watch out for these redundant phrases you’re probably using all the time. 

Tenterhooks vs. tender hooks

Tenterhooks vs. tender hooks
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Right: He’s on tenterhooks waiting for her to call.

Wrong: He’s on tender hooks waiting for her to call.

What the idiom means: A tenterhook is a hook used for drying clothes, but to be “on tenterhooks” means one is impatient for something to happen.

Be aware of these 12 separate words that most people combine into one – but shouldn’t.

And vs. in

And vs. in
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Right: Rest assured, the issue being discussed is front and centre.

Wrong: Rest assured, the issue being discussed is front in centre.

What the idiom means: The object of discussion is a top priority!

These are the 10 grammar mistakes editors hate the most. 

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Tide vs. tie

Tide vs. tie
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Right: That litre of milk should tide you over for the rest of the week.

Wrong: That litre of milk should tie you over for the rest of the week.

What the idiom means: You should have just enough to last you until you can get more!

Look out for these 10 commonly misused words you need to stop getting wrong. 

Intents vs. intensive

Intents vs. intensive
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Right: For all intents and purposes, the library is the best place to find out-of-print books.

Wrong: For all intensive purposes, the library is the best place to find out-of-print books.

What the idiom means: For all intents and purposes means for practical reasons, or in every practical sense.

Here are 16 spelling rules you should have memorised by now. 

Work in vs. working

Work in vs. working
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Right: The child’s reading skills are a work in progress.

Wrong: The child’s reading skills are a working progress.

What the idiom means: Work in progress is a way to say that there is room for improvement, but progress is being made!

Bald-faced vs. boldfaced

Bald-faced vs. boldfaced
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Right: He told his constituents a bald-faced lie.

Wrong: He told his constituents a boldfaced lie.

What the idiom means: To say that someone is bald-faced means they’re shameless; to tell a bald-faced lie means they’ve told a blatant lie.

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