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What your teacher really thinks

What your teacher really thinks
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A look inside a teacher’s mind could help you understand lesson plans and maybe even guide your child to perform better.

Don’t hesitate to reach out

Don’t hesitate to reach out
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If you have a question, reach out to us. We want your child to succeed just as much as you do. Open communication between families and teachers builds bonds that help students do their absolute best.

Create rules at home

Create rules at home
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Creating a system of incentives and consequences at home can help students behave in school. Rewarding them for having a good day at school can make those days more frequent.

Their homework isn’t going to look the same as yours

Their homework isn’t going to look the same as yours
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Teaching methods have changed a lot over the years, so don’t be shocked when your child’s homework looks unfamiliar to you. Don’t tell them not to use a certain math strategy just because you learned something different. Do research or reach out to your child’s teacher to familiarise yourself with newer methods so you can help when your child has a question.

Have your child keep a journal

Have your child keep a journal
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It’s a good idea to have your child keep a journal from a young age. Have them draw pictures and jot down notes about their day. It’s a good way for students to reflect and set goals. It also serves as a safe place to process their emotions.

We have your child’s best interests in mind

We have your child’s best interests in mind
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If we make a call home or give your child a recommendation, it’s not to put them down, it’s to help them succeed. Most teachers have their students’ best interests in mind and will go out of their way to make sure they are helping them in any way they can.

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Come back from holiday earlier

Come back from holiday earlier
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It’s never a good idea to send your kids back to school the day after a long flight. They’re wiped out and can’t function properly most of the time. Also, don’t schedule a vacation that runs into the first few days on the school year. It puts a lot of pressure on your child to play catch up once they get back and causes a lot of stress for both the student and teacher.

Don’t miss these essential tips for travelling with children.

Play time is just as important as time in the classroom

Play time is just as important as time in the classroom
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Many parents don’t realise how much their kids are learning when they are playing with other kids. Play has many developmental benefits. Kids are learning social skills such as negotiation and communication, understanding their bodies, and learning through trial and error.

Our jobs aren’t cute

Our jobs aren’t cute
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If we teach small children, don’t tell us that our jobs are “so cute” and that you wish you could glue and colour all day long. Children express a whole new side of themselves when they’re outside of their home.

I’m not a marriage counsellor

I’m not a marriage counsellor
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At parent-teacher conferences, let’s stick to your child’s progress, not how your husband doesn’t help you around the house.

Here are 14 things you should never say to your spouse. 

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Reader’s Digest Magazine delayed due to coronavirus
Please be advised that due to the current lockdown in Malaysia and the Philippines, Reader’s Digest magazine will not be available at its regular on-sale date to our subscribers or through our retail channels in these regions. We hope to have the issues available around 15 April in Malaysia and around 24 April in the Philippines, but this is dependent on when the lockdown restrictions are lifted. We sincerely apologise for this inconvenience.
Thank you and stay safe!
– The Reader’s Digest team