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In France

In France
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French children don’t get treats from the Easter bunny; they get them from the Easter bells. According to Catholic teaching, no church bells can ring between Holy Thursday and the Easter Vigil, on account of the solemnity of the days around Jesus’s death. Eventually, a legend evolved that said the church bells weren’t rung because they grew wings and flew to Rome to be blessed by the Pope. Then they returned Easter day with chocolate and presents for local kids. (Non-chocolate) egg lovers will also appreciate another French tradition… since 1973, members of the Brotherhood of the Giant Omelette have gathered in Bessières, France, to cook an omelette made up of over a whopping 15,000 eggs. How did this begin? The legend goes that when French military leader Napoléon Bonaparte and his army stopped to rest for a night near the town, he ate an omelette so delicious that he ordered the townspeople to gather all the eggs they had to prepare a giant omelette for his army the next day.

Learn 10 “facts” about eggs that are an absolute yolk.

In India

In India
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Even though Christians only make up 2.5 percent of India’s population, they still have elaborate Easter festivities, especially in the northeastern states. The western India state Goa celebrates with carnivals, complete with street plays, songs and dances. People exchange chocolates, flowers and colourful lanterns as gifts.

In Italy

In Italy
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On Pasqua (“Easter” in Italian), residents of Florence celebrate a 350-year-old tradition called scoppio del carro, which means “explosion of the cart.” A centuries-old cart is loaded with fireworks and pulled in front of the Duomo, where spectators watch the pyrotechnics go off. It’s meant to be a sign of peace and a good year ahead. South of Florence is the town Panicale, where the big celebration happens the day after Easter (called Pasquetta, or little Easter). Locals gather for the annual Ruzzolone, a competition that involves rolling huge wheels of Ruzzola cheese around the perimeter of the village.

These Easter crafts will brighten any home.

In Poland

In Poland
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The day before Easter, families prepare a “blessing basket.” It’s filled with coloured eggs, sausages, bread and other important food and taken to church to be blessed. In Polish culture, Lent isn’t over until a priest blesses this basket. Like their Italian neighbours, the Polish save their most notable tradition for the day after Easter: Smigus Dyngus, also known as Wet Monday. Young boys try to get girls (and each other) wet with water guns, buckets of water, and any other means they can think of. Legend has it that girls who get soaked will marry within the year.

You’ll also enjoy these 14 Valentine’s Day traditions from around the world.

In Latin America

In Latin America
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Many Latin American countries, Brazil and certain regions of Spain participate in The Burning of Judas. Residents make an effigy (or multiple effigies) of Judas, the apostle who betrayed Jesus, and burn it in a central location. Sometimes, people make the effigy explode with fireworks.

In Spain

In Spain
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The town of Verges commemorates Holy Thursday with the Dansa de la Mort (Death Dance). During this night procession, participants dress up like skeletons and re-enact scenes from the Passion. The last skeletons in the parade carry a box of ashes with them. On the other side of the country, residents of Almaden de la Plata have a custom of placing straw effigies of famous people around the city (similar to The Burning of Judas), then tearing them up and throwing the pieces in the air.

Find out what the Day of the Dead festival is all about.

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In the UK

In the UK
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Many communities in England have Easter performances of Morris dancing, a traditional type of folk dance dating back to the Middle Ages. Men dress up, wearing hats and bells around their ankles, and wave ribbons while dancing through the streets. It’s believed that the dances drive the spirits of winter away and bring good luck. Another famous Easter tradition (recognised around the world) is egg jarping. Two players smash hard-boiled eggs together, and whoever has the egg that’s still intact is the winner. The World Jarping Championships are held each Easter in Durham, England.

Here are some easy Easter crafts that kids can make with stuff around the house.

In Greece

In Greece
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When in Greece, you might want to keep an eye out for flying objects during Easter. When the clock strikes 11 on the morning of Easter Saturday, residents of the Greek island Corfu throw clay pots from their balconies onto the street. This noisy and therapeutic custom is performed to symbolise the earthquake that followed the resurrection of Jesus. Others believe the tradition started in the 16th century when people would throw all of their old belongings out of the window to prepare for the new year and mark new beginnings.

Speaking of which, here are 20 lucky New Year’s traditions from around the world.

In Finland: Easter witches

In Finland: Easter witches
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Instead of an egg hunt, prepare for Halloween with an Easter twist in this Nordic country. To celebrate the holiday, Finnish children dress up like witches and go knocking door-to-door reciting a traditional rhyme wishing neighbours a healthy year in exchange for a chocolate egg or coin. Willow twigs decorated with colourful feathers and paper are also carried to drive away evil spirits. The tradition roots from belief that evil spirits and witches used to wander around the streets misbehaving before Easter.

Here are 10 fascinating wedding traditions from around the world.

In Guatemala: Colourful carpets

In Guatemala: Colourful carpets
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Cobble stone roads in Antigua, Guatemala are transformed into colourful carpets to mark Easter. The stunning rainbow-like pathways are made using coloured sawdust, vegetables and flowers and can stretch up to 800 metres long. Local artists use stencils to create the elaborate patterns and scenes covering traditional and religious themes. Feast your eyes on the display while you can – the Good Friday procession over the carpets will be followed by a clean-up team that’ll sweep up all remnants of the art.

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