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Drink more water

Drink more water
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You need water – and so do your ears. Dehydration is a cause of dizziness, says the Mayo Clinic. Dr Bennetsen also recommends avoiding substances that can deplete fluids such as alcoholic beverages, salty foods and caffeine.

Watch out for these 7 unexpected signs and symptoms of dehydration.

Surgical solutions

Surgical solutions
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In some rare instances, surgery may be the only treatment that can ease your symptoms of your vertigo. Dr Dalvi says an acoustic neuroma – a benign tumour – can grow on the vestibular nerve between the inner ear and brain, disrupting balance and hearing. According to the Mayo Clinic, your doctor may monitor this slow-growing neuroma, choose to treat it with radiation or advise surgical removal. Another rare source of vertigo is a malignant brain tumour.

Check your medications

Check your medications
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Many popular prescribed medications can trigger side effects like dizziness and vertigo. Or drugs can interact to disturb your balance. Let your doctor know about over-the-counter meds you take and don’t forget to include supplements and herbs. According to the experts at the Mayo Clinic, prescriptions and over-the-counter drugs that may cause dizziness include:

  • antidepressants
  • anti-seizure drugs
  • blood pressure-lowering drugs
  • sedatives
  • tranquilisers

Healthy habits may help

Healthy habits may help
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A healthy lifestyle is another vertigo prevention strategy that you need to do no matter what the cause. Try reducing stress and making sure to get enough sleep. Eat a diet full of produce and lean proteins, and stay active (given your condition).

Here are 17 things the world’s healthiest people have in common.

Bone up on vitamin D

Bone up on vitamin D
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Falling short of this vital nutrient can harm your bones – your body needs vitamin D to absorb calcium. Patients with the most common type of vertigo (BPPV) who were deficient in vitamin D may have benefitted from supplementing with D, per 2016 research in Auris Nasus Larynx. Patients were less likely to suffer a relapse of symptoms. (One limitation, however, was the lack of control group in the study.)

Discover 10 ways to make vitamins and minerals work better for you.

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Source: RD.com

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