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Loss of inhibitions can lead to new passions

Loss of inhibitions can lead to new passions
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Weisbrod says she sees this a lot: For example, she encouraged a man who never wanted to socialise to attend a music program; suddenly, he began singing show tunes from old musicals. “Residents who never picked up a paintbrush discover their inner Rembrandt,” she says. Residents who are non-verbal may find new ways to express themselves.

Find out the habits that can reduce your risk of Alzheimer’s.

Hospitals need your help

Hospitals need your help
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“When we get a patient with Alzheimer’s admitted to the hospital, it’s important that we know what things help keep that person calm and engaged,” explains Margaret Foley, director of care management at an aged care home. “Because they do not have the ability to reason in the same way we do, we need to enter into their reality and be present with them where they are at the hospital. It is very important for these patients to have loved ones often visit and stay with the patient to help keep them calm.”

You need to adjust your behaviour

You need to adjust your behaviour
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“Rather than trying to correct a patient’s behaviour, you need to adjust yours,” notes Marina Kogan, RN, care coordination manager of a nursing home. If a patient is looking for his mother who has passed away, says Kogan, don’t remind him that his mother passed away. Instead, redirect him by asking him to tell you about his mum, she suggests. “It is not about what is right or wrong, but making him feel comfortable at the moment,” says Kogan.

There is still room for laughter

There is still room for laughter
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“I got a call from the Adult Day Centre that my mother was in a time out because she got in a fight on the bus – she thought someone took her seat,” recalls Tyson-Wearren. Another time she ran around the neighbourhood with her husband frantically searching for her mother. It turned out mum was on the back deck enjoying a glass of juice. “We always found some laughter in everything,” says Tyson-Wearren.

Next, find out the things neurologists do to help prevent Alzheimer’s disease.

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Source: RD.com

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