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You’ll learn more about yourself

You’ll learn more about yourself
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Once you stop scrolling through other people’s opinions, you will likely find out more about what motivates you, not them. “When people remove themselves from social media, they lose that temptation to garner attention and superficial feedback from other people by posting where they went to dinner or where they went on vacation,” says Tom Kersting, LPC, a licensed psychotherapist, and family counsellor and author of Disconnected: How to Reconnect Our Digitally Distracted Kids. “That need to be relevant in the eyes of others will lose its grip, leading to the discovery of one’s self.”

Your decision-making skills will improve

Your decision-making skills will improve
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Many people’s beliefs and values are influenced by what they read on social media. According to a study from Pew Research, half of Facebook users get their news just from the site. “A lot of the decisions people are making isn’t about thinking, it’s a collective consciousness,” Kersting says. Remove yourself from social media and you’ll learn how to think more and make decisions and choices independently.

You’ll argue less

You’ll argue less
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It’s much easier to type a scathing remark when you’re hiding behind a screen than hurling an insult when you’re in the same room as someone. But when you stop using social media, you’re taking yourself out of the fray and you’ll be less emotionally charged. “So you don’t have to carry around with you all day what you’re pissed off about that someone posted,” Kersting says.

Here are more ways your mobile phone affects body and mind.

You’ll develop more emotional intelligence

You’ll develop more emotional intelligence
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Ditching social media may not only make you a nicer person, but it could also help you develop your emotional intelligence, a valuable skill in the workplace. But it does require that you, yes, interact with other human beings. “When we’re on a computer screen for hours a day, then we’re removing the possibility of having face-to-face interaction and we’re reducing our emotional intelligence,” Kersting says. Lifting your head from the screen and having real conversations can increase the quality of your relationships and help you develop this critical skill.

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Source: RD.com

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