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11 best foods to help reduce stress

11 best foods to help reduce stress
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Food and stress have a complex relationship. Not only can what you eat impact your stress levels, but being stressed can increase your need for certain vitamins and minerals, according to a 2016 review in the Journal of Nutrition and Food Sciences. So eating right may help improve your stress-related symptoms. Nutrients, including complex carbohydrates, proteins, vitamin C, vitamin B, magnesium and selenium, actually seem to reduce levels of the stress hormone cortisol, according to the 2016 review. So, you’ll want to consider adding these nutrient-filled foods to your shopping trolley for extra stress relief.

Salmon

Salmon
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Make friends with the fishmonger because salmon may counteract the effects of the stress hormones adrenaline and cortisol, which is why it is one of the best foods that reduce stress. “The anti-inflammatory properties of omega-3 fatty acids found in salmon may offset the effects of these hormones,” says dietitian Shahzadi Devje. “This helps reduce anxiety and improve your response to stress.”

High in protein and low in carbs, these foods will help you to lose weight.

Okra

Okra
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This green veggie contains folate and the B vitamin that produces dopamine, the get-happy hormone. “The effect of this hormone on the brain induces a feeling of pleasure,” Devje says. A 2017 study in the Journal of Psychiatric Research found that people with depression had lower levels of folate in comparison to those without depression. The study can’t prove that the low folate was the cause of the depression, just that the two were linked, but it may help to make sure you have an adequate intake.

Porridge

Porridge
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Tucking into a warm bowl of porridge could make you feel more relaxed and calm, according to the 2016 review in the Journal of Nutrition and Food Sciences. “Eating complex carbs increases the production of serotonin, a brain chemical that reduces stress hormones,” Devje says. Although oats haven’t been studied specifically as a way to help relieve anxiety, they are a good source of tryptophan which the body converts to serotonin.

Dark chocolate

Dark chocolate
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Most people would probably agree that chocolate is one of their favourite foods that reduce stress. Just unwrapping a piece of dark chocolate could put a smile on your face, but some research suggests that eating it may enhance those feel-good effects. “Growing evidence suggests that the antioxidants in cocoa help relax blood vessels, helping to lower blood pressure and boost circulation,” Devje says. One 2017 study found that 20 g per day of dark chocolate could have a beneficial effect on cardiovascular health.

Potatoes

Potatoes
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Who doesn’t love this comfort food? Turns out it’s totally legit to crave starches like potatoes when stressed. It’s called hedonic hunger, or eating for pleasure rather than to fuel your body. “We don’t need the calories, but since we’re hardwired to be attracted to high-calorie foods because they give us energy, we tend to seek out fatty or sweet foods when we’re stressed,” explains Dr Martica Heaner, an exercise physiologist and adjunct associate nutrition professor at Hunter College, New York City. Instead, reach for potatoes, which contain fibre, potassium, vitamin C and other nutrients. Heaner also suggests sweet potatoes for a stress fix.

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Spinach

Spinach
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When we’re frazzled, our muscles tighten up, we can’t think clearly, we have trouble sleeping, and our blood pressure spikes. One nutrient that can help ease those symptoms is magnesium, but when we’re stressed, our magnesium levels plummet. “Dark, leafy vegetables such as spinach are nutrient-dense foods that contain high levels of magnesium,” says Dr David Nico, author of Diet Diagnosis: Navigating the Maze of Health and Nutrition Plans.

Magnesium can also put the spring back in your step!

Green tea

Green tea
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Fire up the kettle and nestle in for a comforting cup of stress relief. “The active nutrient found primarily in the green tea plant is the amino acid L-theanine,” Nico explains. A study published in Biological and Pharmaceutical Bulletin found the anti-stress benefits of the L-theanine in low-caffeine green tea, relaxes the mind without contributing to a drowsy effect on the brain. Another bonus: Green tea isn’t likely to give you jitters the way coffee can.

Sunflower seeds

Sunflower seeds
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Stress often results in the ‘flight or fight’ mode, which is taxing on the adrenal glands. “Sunflower seeds are high in vitamin B5, which supports adrenal gland function, which is critical in stress management,” Nico says.

Oranges

Oranges
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Peeling an orange is a good distraction from stress, for starters. Oranges and other citrus fruits also contain myo-inositol, a naturally occurring form of B vitamin that’s found in high levels in the brain and nervous system. “Cell membrane, muscle and nerve function rely on myo-inositol,” Nico says. “Myo-inositol supports emotional health and a positive mood.”

Oranges are also high in vitamin C, which is vital for a good night’s sleep.

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– The Reader’s Digest team