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Essential reading before your next salon visit

Essential reading before your next salon visit
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Women are constantly bombarded with tips on how to look half their age, but what if you just want to look amazing for your age (thank you very much)? One of the simplest ways to do that is to pay more attention to your hair. Think of your haircut, hair colour and hairstyle a bit like you would makeup or that seriously sexy blouse that always makes you feel like a million bucks – only in the case of hair, it’s game-on every single day. The right hair for your face and lifestyle can make sure you look like your absolute best, most refreshed, and ready-to-take-on-the-universe version of yourself. And then there are these 12 common hairstyle mistakes that will age your face. Here’s how to avoid them.

Falling for flat hair

Falling for flat hair
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A centre part can be super chic, there’s no doubt about it. But as we age, our hair thins. Even those of us with medium to thick hair will experience thinning, according to celebrity hairstylist Nunzio Saviano at Nunzio Saviano Salon in New York City. “If you’re in your 50s wearing your hair parted in the middle, it isn’t flattering,” Saviano says. Instead, you need to increase your hair’s volume so you don’t bring attention to this age-related problem. Saviano suggests either a different (usually shorter) haircut, a change in the way you part your hair, or a product like Kenra Platinum Dry Texture Spray #6 to increase hair density.

Follow this advice on dealing with female hair loss. 

Infrequent trims

Infrequent trims
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Another ageing mistake that goes hand in hand with flat hair is keeping your hair way too long for your face shape and never trimming it. The fact that we associate longer hair with youth has a lot to do with the images we constantly see in films and on television (from Disney princesses to soap-opera actresses to major celebs). But Saviano says the opposite effect takes hold as we age: Longer hair looks thinner, and thinner hair is ageing. His preferred look? “The Lob. Collarbone-length hair or a bob looks chic,” he says. “If you have a long face, a bob can shorten it, and if you can have a round face, it can lengthen it. As you get older, it works on everyone.”

For more inspiration, check out these 40 best hairstyles for women over 40.

Not framing your face

Not framing your face
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Even if you want to keep your hair all one length, you should add a few subtle, face-framing layers to draw attention to your most flattering facial features and lift your face for a more refreshed appearance. Some women aren’t sure where their first face-framing layer should begin, and Saviano says there’s one solution that works for everyone: “The perfect place for layers to start is the cheekbone – that brings out the cheekbone, which is an instant face-lift. Face framing creates body around the face, and with these shorter pieces, you can flick the [fringe] to the side or even do a curtain fringe.”

Getting the wrong fringe

Getting the wrong fringe
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Fringes aren’t the singular entity we sometimes think they are. There are a number of different fringe styles, like a blunt fringe, a baby fringe, a curtain fringe, a side-swept fringe…and the list goes on. If you’re tempted to cut a fringe, Saviano is your biggest supporter, but he cautions that it’s important to keep three factors in mind. “You have to get [a fringe] that suit your lifestyle – some require trims every two to three weeks,” he explains. “They also have to be suitable for your hair texture and for your face shape. If one of those three things is off, you aren’t going to enjoy your fringe.”

If your hair is very thin and you’re worried that a fringe will take away from your overall look, Saviano recommends sticking with cheekbone-framing fringe.

Going too dark

Going too dark
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Raven hair is mysterious and sultry, but after a certain age, hair that is too dark and all one shade looks flat. A single process that’s super dark lacks highlights and lowlights, which means all of the attention will be on your skin. If you would rather not have a spotlight thrown on fine lines and wrinkles, it’s best to incorporate a mix of shades to achieve a more sun-kissed look. “Going too dark with a single process can look too harsh and severe,” says Felicia Dosso, a colourist at Nunzio Saviano Salon. “Softer, more natural tones are more youthful.” Of course, that doesn’t mean you have to bleach your hair blond, but shades of caramel, chestnut, and light coffee can create a beautiful balance in dark hair.

Don’t miss these 36 secrets your hair stylist won’t tell you. 

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Cutting layers that are too short

Cutting layers that are too short
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Cutting layers in your hair is a little bit like enjoying fairy floss or a Pavlova. A few bites (or layers) can be breathtaking, but overdoing it can lead to a wicked stomach ache (in your hair’s case, very thin ends). “A lot of women cut layers that are too short to make it look like there’s more body in their hair,” Saviano says. “But you’re making the hair look thinner when it is over layered. That hair has to come from some place, and it’s always cut from the bottom, so it makes the bottom look thin.”

Bring in plenty of photos when you visit your salon for a cut, but be sure your desires work with your hair type – and not some random model’s hair – especially when it comes to layering.

Overdoing it with conditioners

Overdoing it with conditioners
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There’s a fine line between keeping your hair conditioned so that it stays soft and shiny and attacking it with heavy-duty conditioning treatments that only end up weighing your hair down and making strands look greasy and limp. If you have thick, curly and coarse hair, a deep conditioner can tame frizz and make locks gorgeously glossy. But it’s important to read labels and choose a formula that’s right for your hair type. Saviano says he generally recommends lightweight conditioners that are rinsed out.

Asking for ashy tones

Asking for ashy tones
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A quality colourist isn’t there to just mix up whatever colours you throw at the wall and apply them to your hair. These hair-care professionals aren’t only knowledgeable about shades – they also know which hues suit your skin tone and eye colour and make you look even more stunning, as well as which will leave your skin looking dull. On some women, ash-brown, beige or vanilla highlights can look gorgeous, but if your goal is to look more youthful, they aren’t always the best choice. “Ashy-toned highlights can make hair look dull and give off a greyish cast,” Dosso says. “Light reflects better off of more neutral, warmer tones, which ultimately creates shine.”

Neglecting your scalp

Neglecting your scalp
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The anti-ageing industry is a multi-billion dollar business, and many women spend a ton of money on skin-care products and treatments like Botox and fillers. The biggest hair mistake that Saviano says he sees women making as they age is spending money on everything else and neglecting their scalps. “The scalp has to be taken care of just as much as the face,” Saviano explains. “A lot of times, women and men are uneducated about the scalp. You can keep the follicles strong with diet, and getting scalp treatments when you get a haircut really makes a difference.”

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Reader’s Digest Magazine delayed due to coronavirus
Please be advised that due to the current lockdown in Malaysia and the Philippines, Reader’s Digest magazine will not be available at its regular on-sale date to our subscribers or through our retail channels in these regions. We hope to have the issues available around 15 April in Malaysia and around 24 April in the Philippines, but this is dependent on when the lockdown restrictions are lifted. We sincerely apologise for this inconvenience.
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