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9 surprising postmenopausal health risks you can’t ignore

From gum disease to sleep apnoea and more, the hormonal changes of menopause can make women more vulnerable to certain conditions. Here’s what may be in store – and what can be done about it.

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Osteoporosis
Osteoporosis
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Unfortunately, the longer your body goes without a menstrual period, the higher your risk of osteoporosis and fracture. Oestrogen plays a big role in maintaining bone density. Some 20 to 30 per cent of bone loss in women occurs in the first five years after menopause, which can lead to increased risk of fractured hips and bone density issues.
 
Perhaps, what’s worse, many postmenopausal women are in denial about their personal risk, according to an International Osteoporosis Foundation survey of women in 11 countries. And this means they don’t take steps to safeguard those bones, including eating a calcium-rich diet, performing weight-bearing exercises and strength-training, and limiting too much sodium as well as beverages (alcohol, soft drinks, coffee) that leach calcium from bones.
 
Check out these 19 things you can do in under 10 minutes to help you live longer.
 



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